Support of SDNRP to the Development of Cadaster, Inspectorate and Audit Functions (GAF) Jan.-11

Ministry of Mines
Afghanistan

Ref Mom/PMU/4, IDA Grant No H 238AF under project ID No P089118.

 Summary of Project Activities
Nov 2008 – Dec 2010

January 2011.
Background to this summary. 

During 2008, negotiations were held with GAF AG which resulted in the award of contract as detailed above. This is part of SDNRP termed “ Establishment of Cadastre, Inspection, Audit and Licensing functions in Ministry of Mines, Afghanistan.”
The scope of this work is divided into two parts;

1. Establishment of Cadastre and Licensing functions.
2. Capacity Building and development of Audit functions in the Department of Inspectorate.

GAF mobilized their team in November 2008 and work progressed as follows;

Project Management:

Deployment in Kabul of the project team heralded the start of operation and an office was established, recruitment of local staff together with procurement of necessary equipment was done. Liaison with the client was established. Internal organizational structures were established as were budgetary controls and reporting procedures.

Cadastre:

A work-plan was developed which included:

1. A review of the current cadastre department including assessment of work procedures.
2. A review of the current legal framework
3. Development of the cadastre including computerization.

The first two tasks were completed showing the following results;

1. The cadastre department had been established and staffed and operating with some contracts issued under 2005 Minerals Law. Contracting procedures had been developed, with the main feature being the “bidding system”.
2. All contracts for quarries were being handled in the Presidency of Extraction. It was not been established how many quarry and small scale contracts existed but it was believed that the number could be about 150.
3. Regulations had not yet been developed.

The 2009 Minerals Law was then enacted, however the corresponding cadastre regulations were being undertaken by a legal consultant and this delayed the development of cadastral procedures until these were promulgated.
Work continued in understanding and documenting the current contract issuing procedures. As soon as sufficient data had been collected, software development of the Computerized Mining Cadastre System (CMCS) was started. Some training in basic computer literacy including the use of databases and a course on GIS were conducted.
Developmental work on the CMCS and on the required standard forms has continued and the ‘embryonic’ CMCS together with the mapping function has been installed in MoM and tested. Training on the operation of the CMCS has started and will continue with further development and final installation of the system once networking and hardware is complete.
Assistance and input to the new ‘organizational structure’ was given and when finalised, will assist in office organisation and work-flows within the cadastre.
An analysis of the quarry licenses held in Presidency of Extraction was undertaken and all relevant data pertaining to these licenses was correlated onto a spreadsheet and made public. All documents including copies of the licenses have been categorized and filed in an alpha/numeric storage system.  
Delays in the development of the cadastre have been the result of an incomplete regulatory framework which is still not finalised at the time of writing. (See section on Legal Issues)

Inspectorate:

Paramount to the training of the inspectorate was an understanding of the tasks that would be undertaken by the mine inspectors and their current capabilities to conduct these tasks. This study was undertaken in the inception phase of the project.
Although a figure of 38 inspectors was given as the group to be trained, in reality, there were only 25 as a result of the ministry failing to recruit suitable people because of poor packages. Some of this group have left to better positions. All the trainees were already part of Department of Inspection and graduates of Geosciences Department from Kabul Polytechnic.
A curriculum covering all the necessary technical and mine inspection related subjects was developed. An early assessment of the trainees showed that there was a lack of understanding of basic mining and an introductory course, “What is a Mine” was developed and presented as the start to the training. This was followed by class-room courses in relevant subjects such as; health & safety, mining, both surface and underground, mineral processing, deposit evaluation, mechanical & electrical engineering, basic survey and mine auditing. All study material has been developed and presented by the GAF trainers. This has, where possible, included visual aid material. Some practical training at local quarry sites was been conducted especially in survey and health & Safety. Three field trips to operating mines were undertaken and training in various aspects of mining including survey and use of GPS was done.  Audits were conducted and comprehensive reports were compiled on these mine visits. Additional short courses, were introduced where necessary which have given the trainees a broader insight to the overall mining industry and has increased their knowledge and understanding of their future task.
Theoretical class-room training is almost complete and because very limited facilities for practical training exist in Afghanistan, a comprehensive study tour to South Africa has been organized for February 2011. This study tour will demonstrate the practical aspects of mining and give the trainees exposure to many different types of extraction methods and associated aspects of a vibrant mining industry.
Graduation of the mine inspectors is planned for May 2011.


Appendix 1: contains the detailed list of study courses developed and presented for this training.


Additional activities of the GAF team.
The GAF team consists of 4 mining engineers together with a number of local interpreters and translators. As expected, the experience of this team has been used by the MoM in areas outside of the ToR’s.

Study Tour to Germany: In April 2010, a ten day study tour was conducted for some of the cadastre and inspectorate staff which included a few days at the world renowned Bauma Mining Exhibition in Munich. Three mine visits and a  visit to a gas storage facility were included in the itinery including both underground and open-pit mines. This visit increased the student’s appreciation of what a mining industry encompassed.   

Legal Issues:  In early 2009, the new Mineral Law and Hydrocarbon Law were gazetted. A consultant was employed to develop the Mining Regulations and GAF Team undertook to assist by developing the regulations pertaining to health & safety and operations of the mines including the use of explosives. These aspects were beyond the experience of the legal consultant. In late 2009, due to the pressure of meeting the HIPC targets, these regulations went through the legal process of being enacted but due to a lack of understanding in the Ministry of Justice, all the regulations developed by GAF team were excluded and an incomplete set of mining regulations was gazetted in early 2010.
In early 2010, Minister Shahrani took office and set up a committee to review the Minerals and Hydrocarbons Law and submit proposed amendments that would simplify the licensing procedures and make the Law more ‘Investor Friendly’. GAF team leaders played a leading roll in this process and spent many days working with their Afghan counterparts on proposed amendments to the 2009. The amended Law was submitted to the Ministry of Justice who ruled that the amendments were too numerous to get a quick passage through the enactment process. A compromise has been reached whereby only a minimum number of amendments, those that would achieve the Minister’s main objectives would be made. GAF team continues to be active in the regulatory development.

GPS Training: GAF team has developed and presented training on the practical use of GPS instruments to MoM employees. Training in contract/cadastre data collection has also been given and field teams for data collection have been established.

Formulation of Mining Contracts: GAF team has been very involved in the development and formulation of some of the Mine Contracts. We have, in conjunction with the other consultants in MoM, developed a format that can be used as a ‘standard contract’. We have been involved in assessing and setting parameters for exploration licenses and the transition of these into the mining phase.

Contract Negotiations:  Members of the GAF team have been appointed to a number of committees for contract negotiations. 

Inter Ministerial Commission: A GAF team member has been appointed to the IMC to advise the IMC on relevant technical issues.

International Mining Conferences: GAF has been involved with organizing the participation of Afghanistan Ministry of Mines at some international mining events where the mining opportunities within the country will be promoted.            


Global Assessment of Functioning

APPENDIX 1: SCHEDULE OF INSPECTORATE TRAINING COURSES CONDUCTED

CORE TRAINING COURSES: TECHNICAL TRAINING OF INSPECTORS
MINE SURVEYING & PLAN PREPARATION
INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY
DUTIES OF A MINE INSPECTOR
MINERAL PROCESSING
OPEN PIT MINING
DRILLING & BLASTING
MECHANICAL & ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
UNDERGROUND MINING
HEALTH & SAFETY AUDITING & RISK ASSESSMENT
MINERAL RESOURCE ESTIMATION
INCIDENT INVESTIGATION
PRINCIPLES OF MINE VENTILATION
SUPPLEMENTARY SHORT COURSES
WHAT IS A MINE?
SAFETY MANAGEMENT PLANS
EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES
PRINCIPLES & USE OF THE GPS
IRON & STEEL -MAKING
REPORT WRITING
INTRODUCTION TO THE COMPUTERISED MINING CADASTRE SSTEM (CMCS)
THE ROLE OF THE MINISTRY OF MINES
MINE CASE STUDY: A SMALL GOLD MINE
INTRODUCTION TO THE DRAFT HEALTH & SAFETY REGULATIONS FOR INSPECTORS
BERCHTESGADEN SALT MINE, GERMANY
INTRODUCTION TO THE MINING LAW OF AFGHANISTAN
OVERVIEW OF THE SAN JOSE Au/Cu MINE DISASTER, CHILE
SOUTH AFRICAN STUDY TOUR (SAST) PREPARATIONS